When Finland Decided to Open Up: A Behavioural Scientist’s Perspective

I’ve been writing this post between 4.-21. February 2022, when questionable information is rampant in Finnish public discussions: Omicron is thought to be comparable to the flu, a trend of ever-milder variants is considered an inevitable biological law, the pandemic is (again) claimed to be over, and the sentiment is that there’s nothing much we can or need do about it anyway. This post is a historical reference so we don’t forget what happened to a relatively successful Finnish pandemic management scheme between June 2021 and February 2022. I also present two future scenarios to consider, when the hopium in current media discourse turns out to be hot air again. My hope is, that individuals and communities will shift their perspective and start buffering the nation against bad outcomes, not the best-case scenarios – which do not require preparation anyway. The post does not reflect views of the behavioural science advisory group (KETTU) operating in the Finnish Prime Minister’s Office, nor those of the Citizen Shield pandemic prevention project.

Hi. We’re Finland. You may remember us from hit songs such as Don’t Stand So Close to Me, Unless We’re in the Sauna and Nokia’s Gonna Last Forever. In more recent times, we’ve been cited as one of the best countries in pandemic management: in fact, by fall 2021 had only had approximately one thousand recorded COVID-deaths. Reasons for the relative success include remote geographical location, low population density, and cultural features, including the general avoidance of close physical proximity between individuals – and perhaps less so public health prowess (in fact, we only narrowly avoided going Full Tegnell on the pandemic). Let me just quickly recount what happened to the success story in the latter half of 2021, because it’s kinda funny.

It’s June 2021, right before government officials start their holidays. I’m telling people we should make preparations for the Delta variant. The suggestion is shrugged off with humour, and in all fairness, it did look like we were going to near-zero cases again for the summer… Before a bunch of football fans returning from Russia kicked off the Delta wave. After the usual debate on whether new variants will find Finns attractive, cases started going up, and we were soon in the slow initial growth of the exponential curve. So, there I was in August 2021 when the holidays ended: anxiously awaiting for someone to state, that in order for us to keep the freedoms we had during the summer, we’re going to need to smash the curve (something akin to what various countries from Portugal to Japan later did). Instead, in early September, the government announced everyone has a great need to go back go normal, and that now is the time to do it: “It’s Time to Live!”

Our health officials agreed, because after all, Denmark had already decided, that September 2021 was the time to end precautions*. To quote our director of health security: “We are on the home stretch of the pandemic […] and due to the vaccination rate, don’t need to worry about the pandemic in Finland any more [although minor setbacks may occur]” (September 2021). Also in September, in a particularly funny episode, an epidemiologist from the Finnish equivalent of CDC, called a multidisciplinary group of local precaution-advocating scientists “a crackpots’ day care club”.

*footnote: some may forget, that this did not turn out very well for them or any other of the “we’re going to live with the virus now” countries – Denmark’s end of the pandemic was cancelled, until announced again in early 2022.

Here’s some survey data to describe the Finnish situation from a perspective of personal protective behaviours:

Figure 1: Despite the late adoption of masks, Finns rapidly increased their uptake in Fall 2020. Precautions decline during Fall 2021, under heavy mainstream media pressure to return to normal, and go up again as the situation worsens rapidly.

Major news media seemed convinced not only that the pandemic was over (again), but that they needed to perform psychological interventions to reduce the public’s risk perception – despite rising case numbers. Reporters were calling me on the phone: “You’re a social psychologist; how can we make people go back to normal?”. Chief editors of the largest newspapers made flashy statements such as “COVID is over when everyone stops being afraid”, and “[despite scientists who called for unnecessary suppression] Finland is nearing herd immunity, while Australia and New Zealand are in trouble” (aside: they weren’t, but we were).

The need to go back to normal was couched in statements about the people being tired of protective actions. This was curious, because all the while surveys indicated that people actually thought it was pretty important to continue exercising precaution, even after vaccinations:

Figure 2. Rising trend in stated need to continue precautions from mid-2021 to early 2022 – meanwhile, officials repeat the statement that people are very tired. Note: the behavioural science advisory group combined survey and interview data, concluding in a report in December, that people (mostly younger age groups) are mostly annoyed of restricting close contacts, while e.g. masks in public spaces remained highly acceptable.

In the end of November 2021, Omicron caught us in the midst of an exponentially worsening delta epidemic, and by the time of writing (February 2022), we are waiting for BA2 close to the worst situation of the pandemic’s history. Here’s a summary of what happened when the pandemic management strategy was changed in September 2021, to cater the people’s supposed need to go back to 2019 ASAP:

Figure 3. After Finland switched its pandemic management approach (less testing, never mind total case numbers, aim to go back to normal), things went somewhat awry.

What are we doing currently, to remedy the situation? Surely not repeating any past mistakes? Memorable bits of recent news: Our aim should be to open up quickly, COVID will be just like the flu by summer 2022Vaccinations and a weakening virus are making the epidemic lose its edge. Central assumptions – I repeat, assumptions – include that everyone will get sick, the population becomes stronger with better immunity, and after some time (One year? Ten years? Hundreds / thousands of years?), we don’t need to mind the virus any longer. Seeing our new director of the Ministry of Social Affairs and Health cite the inevitability of getting ill, it just makes me wonder: What none of this is true, who has a Plan B? To a non-doctor, long term neurological and cardiovascular damage does not look like something to aim for, in order to gain short-lived immunity. Also, many public officials in Southern Finland have ignored the law which says you should not let dangerous infectious diseases run amok – does this mean they now have a mental investment in the nothing-could-nor-can-be-done narrative?

If you’re Finnish, you may be suprised that many countries around the world are way better vaccinated than us, and are doing quite a good job in pushing down Omicron with vaccines and protective public health measures. The situation reflects the WHO Director General’s statement calling for a “vaccines-plus” -strategy:

I need to be very clear: vaccines alone will not get any country out of this crisis. Countries can and must prevent the spread of Omicron with measures that work today. It’s not vaccines instead of masks, it’s not vaccines instead of distancing, it’s not vaccines instead of ventilation or hand hygiene. Do it all. Do it consistently. Do it well.

– Director General of the WHO, Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, as quoted in Covid-19: An urgent call for global “vaccines-plus” action 

I end with two long-term scenarios, just to record what I considered the most important at the time of writing:

An optimistic scenario. There’s some critical threshold of disability caused by the pandemic, as well as global supply chain malfunctions from the ever-increasing pace of immunity evading variants. Upon crossing this threshold, health officials, the business sector and/or government representatives understand, that the only way out is to go for the exit – i.e. an elimination strategy. It can be done, but not if you insist traditional epidemiological models are the reality, instead of just ways to simplify some part of it. There’s a paper coming out, which outlines how elimination can be achieved with mass testing; will add link when it’s out. [Note that it is clearly disinformation to state, that talking about elimination means advocating for an eternal lockdown.] Depending on your belief structure, the elimination strategy may seem far-fetched right now, but nonlinear impacts of not doing it can accumulate fast, if and when the pandemic continues its course instead of going away. 

A pessimistic scenario. Finnish Health officials await for a scientific consensus, which keeps proceeding at the pace of Planck’s principle (i.e. every step forward requires the funeral of an influential person keen on retaining the status quo). People “Swedify” and grow complacent, quick to normalise every new turn to the worse. We go back to accepting mortality rates of the pre-antibiotic era, until a new type of vaccine is created, which handles all potential variants. The vaccine is refused by some 5% of the population, from which forms the basis of a polarised societal system. In this system, the official services which refuse the unvaccinated, are replaced by underground / black market equivalents catering to their needs. The default option for countering the next pandemic becomes wait for the vaccine because we learned that anything else is ridiculous and a conspiracy theory. Then, while twiddling our thumbs, the next pandemic kills a billion people, which due to global interconnectedness, permanently changes the lives of several generations.

Tell me I’m wrong.

[with thanks to Kaisa Saurio for helpful comments]

What Does “Behaviour Change Science” Study?

This is an introductory post about this paper. The paper introduces to the object of study in “behaviour change science”, i.e. complex systems – which include most human systems from individuals to communities and nations.

In a health psychology conference many years ago (when we still travelled for that sort of thing), I wandered into the conference venue a bit late, and the sessions had already started. There was just one other person in the hallways, looking a bit lost. I was scared to death of another difficult-to-escape presentation cavalcade about how someone came up with p-values under 0.05, so I made some joke about our confusion and ended up preventing his attendance, too. Turned out he was a physicist recently hired in a behavioural medicine research group, sent to the conference to get his first bearings about the field. Understandably, he was confused with a hint of distraught: “I don’t understand a word about what these people talk about. And I’ve been to several sessions already without having seen a single equation!” (nb. if you don’t think this is funny, you’re probably not a social scientist.)

Given that back then I was finding my first bearings on network science, we had a lot to talk about during the rest of the conference. I don’t remember much about the conference, but I remember him making an excellent point about learning: The best way to learn anything is to talk to someone who’s just learned about the thing. While not yet mega-experts, they still have an idea of where you stand, and can hence make things much more understandable than those, who already swim in a sea of concepts unfamiliar to you.

In a recent paper about behaviour change as a topic of research, we tried to do exactly this. I know I’m crossing the chasm where I’m not yet the mega-expert, but am already losing the ability to see what people in my field find hard to grasp. I presented the paper in a research seminar and people found it quite challenging, but on the other hand, I’ve never seen such ultra-positivity from reviewers. So maybe it’s helpful to some.

This impeccably written manuscript provides a thorough, state-of-the-art review of complex adaptive systems, particularly in the context of behavior change, and it does an excellent job explaining difficult concepts.

– Reviewer 2

Here’s a quick test to see if it might be valuable to you. Have a look at this table, and if you think all is clear, you can skip the piece with good conscience:

I also made a video introduction to the topic. If you’re in a rush, you can just run through a pdf of the slides.

If you’re in an even bigger rush, the picture below gives a quick synopsis. To find out more, check out this post: www.mattiheino.com/besp.

Koronataistelu muuttuu sissisodaksi

Most people in Finland want to protect others from COVID, wheras decision makers and the media are planning celebrations of the end of the pandemic. Meanwhile, the healthcare system is getting overwhelmed fast. The only solution may be self-organisation.

Maaliskuun lopulla ennustin, että tulemme avaamaan yhteiskunnan liian aikaisin. Ennen kesälomia yritin varoitella toistamasta deltamuunnoksen kohdalla samaa virhettä, joka edellisten varianttien tapauksessa oltiin tehty. Kesällä kausivaihtelutoiveet saivat kyytiä, ja delta murtautui Salpalinjan läpi – yhteisen kamppailun sijaan kuitenkin päätettiin, että kansalaisille (lue: aikuisille) rokoteaseistusta tarjoamalla vihollisen metkuista ei tarvitsisi välittää.

En ole ennen kokenut samanlaista ristiriitaa kansainvälisiin kokemuksiin perustuvien suositusten ja suomalaisen median välillä. Olin ällistynyt:

“Me haluamme avata yhteiskunnan, me tulemme sen tekemään […] Me luovumme näistä kaikista rajoituksista, mitä meillä on. Se on hallituksen tahto.” (linkki)

“Korona loppuu siinä vaiheessa, kun kukin meistä itse päättää lakata pelkäämästä” (linkki)

Alla olevasta kuvasta näkyy, että yli 75% kansalaisista pitää suojautumistoimia edelleen tarpeellisena:

Olen yrittänyt kertoa ihmisten jatkuvaa suojautumista ihmetteleville toimittajille, etteivät ihmiset ole suosituksia sokeasti noudattavia robotteja, vaan sopeuttavat toimintaansa tilannekohtaisesti ja ajan myötä muuttuvaan riskiarvioon pohjaten. Tämä on ollut monille vaikea ymmärtää, ja koko pandemian ajan hallitukset ja “asiantuntijat” ovat pelänneet laajamittaista paniikkia, jos ihmisille annetaan liian huolestuttavaa informaatiota. Aiheesta on olemassa erinomainen blogipostaus ja olen itsekin kirjoittanut itseohjautuvuuden tärkeydestä, joten sanottakoon vain, että tämä on tieteellisen kirjallisuuden näkökulmasta päätöntä. Keinotekoisen turvallisuudentunteen pakkosyöttäminen kansalaisille johtaa ongelmiin.

Tähän väliin on hyvä muistuttaa mieliin, että taistelu virusta vastaan on taistelua esim. monielinvaurioita, aivovammoja ja pitkäaikaisia työ-/koulupoissaoloja vastaan, kuolemista puhumattakaan. Viruksen kanssa eläminen tarkoittaa näiden lisääntymisen kanssa elämistä.

Takaisin sodankäyntiin. Perinteisessä sodankäynnissä voidaan karkeasti erotella kaksi keinovalikoimaa:

a) Ne joilla saadaan aikaan nopeasti laaja-alainen vaikutus (panssarivaunupataljoonat aavikolla, mattopommitukset kaupungissa, laivasto avomerellä). Nämä keinot mahdollistaa korkean tason koordinaatio, ja koronatilanteessa niitä voi verrata massarokotuksiin, liikkumisrajoituksiin, rajojen terveysturvallisuuden varmistamiseen karanteenein, sekä testaa-jäljitä-eristä -infrastruktuuriin. Vuonna 2020 Suomessa näitä ajettiin puolivillaisesti, yllättyen yhä uudelleen asioista, jotka eivät vaikuttaneet kovin yllättäviltä.

b) Toinen kategoria sisältää keinoja, joilla saavutetaan pieniä paikallisia voittoja, mahdollisesti vuosien tai vuosikymmenten kuluessa kerääntyen (autonomisesti toimivat sissiryhmät tai muut paikallisväestöön integroituneet erikoisjoukot). Näissä keinoissa “johtoportaalla”, mikäli sellaista on, ei edes välttämättä ole ajantasaista tietoa siitä, mitä joukot tekevät ja missä. Koronatilanteessa niitä voi verrata omatoimiseen pikatestaukseen ennen tapaamisia, ilmanpuhdistinten hankkimiseen työpaikoille ja kouluihin, (FFP2-)maskien käyttöön tilannekohtaisesti, ja kuplautumiseen, ts. vain tietyn porukan kanssa tapaamiseen sekä flunssaoireista tälle porukalle tiedottamiseen. Vuoden 2021 syksyyn asti tämä kategoria pääosin puuttui Suomen koronavasteesta.

Mutta emmekö voisi vain suojella riskiryhmiä? Toki, mutta vaikkei tämä tarkoittaisikaan miljoonan ihmisen eristämistä, on mahdotonta tietää, tuleeko tapaamasi henkilö tapaamaan jonkun, joka ei ole voinut ottaa rokotetta – tai on ottanut 1-2 annosta, mutta teho on ehtinyt hiipua. Onneksi tämä toimii myös toisin päin: suojautumalla voi suojata paljon suurempaa porukkaa, kuin tulee ajatelleeksi. Kysymykseksi muodostuukin: “Ketään ei jätetä” vai “ketäs jätettäisiin jotta ei tarvitsisi tehdä vaivalloisia asioita?”

Kysymykseksi muodostuukin: “Ketään ei jätetä” vai “ketäs jätettäisiin jotta ei tarvitsisi tehdä vaivalloisia asioita”?

Suomessa on pitkälti tukahdutettu keskustelu eliminaatiostrategiasta, vaikka se onkin ainoa tunnettu pitkän tähtäimen ratkaisu pandemioihin, jotka aiheuttavat yleisvaarallista tartuntatautia. Poliitikkojen ja virkamiesten on kuitenkin vaikea sitoutua mihinkään, mikä saattaisi nostaa heidät tikunnokkaan. Viranhaltijalle on turvallista tehdä niin, kuin kaikki muutkin tekevät; parasta politiikkaa on vastuuttaa kansalaisia sen sijaan, että virkakoneisto lähtisi suorittamaan jotain vaivalloista, mikä voi epäonnistua. Nyt, kun tälle linjalle on lähdetty uuden maskisuosituksen myötä, realisti valmistautuu pitkään sissisotaan, jossa yllämainitun a-osaston keinoihin ei voi luottaa – vaikka toivo toki elää.

Ehkä hallitus voisikin antaa maskisuosituksen tapaisen, virallisen “oman harkinnan mukaan” toteutettavan ilmahygieniasuosituksen, pikatestaussuosituksen ja kuplautumissuosituksen. Virkamiesten haasteet toteuttaa tehtäviään tuovat suomalaisille erinomaisen tilaisuuden oppia paikallisesti itseorganisoituvaa turvallisuustoimintaa. Mutta kokonaisstrategian epäonnistumista ei voi vierittää rokottamattomille, niin kätevää kuin se olisikin kaiken epidemian vähättelyn jälkeen.

Toimimalla nyt omatoimisesti ennakoiden – pikatestit, FFP2-maskit (myös uudelleenkäytettynä), tuuletus, ilmanpuhdistus, kontaktien rajoittaminen – voimme vielä estää mustan joulun.

Pandemia, irtikytkeytymiskyvykkyys ja mitä sitten?

This post lays out, in a nutshell, why I care about pandemics and how I think we should reasonably treat them.

Päivitys 23.12.2021: Alkuperäinen kirjoitus oli kesäkuussa 2021. Kirjoitus tarkastettu tällä päivämäärällä, ja todettu entistäkin ajankohtaisemmaksi (päivitetty ainoastaan Olet tässä -kuva).

Kysymys: Miksi pandemioista pitäisi välittää?

Vastaus: Tiedämme, että historiallisesti pandemioiden kuolonuhrit noudattavat äärimmäisen paksuhäntäistä todennäköisyysjakaumaa (esim. GPD-jakaumasta* todennäköisyys yli miljardin kuolonuhrin pandemialle ~1%).

(*parametrit: xi = 1.62, mu = 0, beta = 1.1747 * 10^6; ks. tämä)

Tiedämme myös, että riskiarvio on alakanttiin, koska globaali verkostoituneisuus on viimeisen 100 vuoden aikana lisääntynyt räjähdysmäisesti. Tämä lisää erilaisten dominoefektien todennäköisyyttä, jolloin seuraukset voivat olla tuhoisat (ks. esim. tämä tai tämä). Koronapandemia oli tätä taustaa vasten erinomainen valmiusharjoitus, sillä se ei pyyhkinyt suurta osaa ihmiskuntaa planeetalta – mikä on pitkällä tähtäimellä paitsi mahdollista, myös todennäköistä, mikäli kaikkialta pääsee kaikkialle kaiken aikaa (ks. tämä).

Kysymys: Mitä tarkoitat, kun sanot “vanha normaali”?

Vastaus: Tarkoitan 1900-luvun loppupuolella kehittynyttä mielialaa, jossa ajateltiin, että 1) pandemioista ei tarvitse välittää ja 2) naiivi skientismi on (epävarmuustekijöiden myöntämisen ja kontrolloinnin sijaan) ratkaisu käytännössä kaikkiin ihmiskuntaa kohtaaviin ongelmiin.

Kysymys: Mitä tarkoitat, kun sanot “uusi normaali”?

Vastaus: Tarkoitan tilannetta, jossa yhteiskunnan jatkuvuus varmistetaan, jotta voidaan nauttia saavutetuista eduista kuten vapaudesta, terveydestä ja hyvästä elämästä.

Kysymys: Miltä tämä sitten näyttäisi?

Vastaus: Jokapäiväinen elämä näyttäisi samalta kuin vuonna 2019, lukuunottamatta sitä, että aggressiivisten tartuntatautien esiintymisalueille matkustavien tulisi palatessaan käydä luotettavassa testissä tai viettää aikaa esim. karanteenihotellissa. Meillä olisi lisäksi arsenaalissamme irtikytkeytymiskyvykkyyttä: uusien, vakavien patogeenien ilmaantuessa jossain päin maailmaa, voisimme pystyttää palomuureja globaalin virusverkoston oville. Tämä pitäisi voida tehdä mahdollisimman vähän ihmisten elämää ja yhteiskunnan toimintoja häiriten – tavoitteena olisi, ettei se näkyisi millään tapaa jokapäiväisessä elämässä (rajojen yli säännöllisesti esim. työnsä vuoksi liikkuvat voisivat jatkaa liikkumista haettuaan siihen luvan).

Irtikytkeytyminen olisi aina väliaikaista ja sitä lyhyempää, mitä nopeammin uhkaavan patogeenin riskiarviointi saataisiin tehtyä. Sen hyväksyttävyyttä tulisi arvioida kuuntelemalla kaikkia kansan sosioekonomisia luokkia: ei ole lainkaan itsestäänselvää, että varakkaiden tulisi voida matkustaa (aina, kaikkialle, ja kaiken aikaa), mikäli se tarkoittaa haavoittuvampien ryhmien elämän merkittävää häiriintymistä (esim. kirjastojen ja muiden julkisten palveluiden sulku, tulonmenetykset ja vaikeasti toteutettavat etätyövaatimukset, jne.)

Käytännössä tämä tarkoittaisi hälytysjärjestelmää, jonka lauetessa testausta ja karanteeneja otettaisiin käyttöön mieluummin liian nopeasti kuin liian hitaasti, sillä mikäli järjestelmä pettää ja uusi patogeeni pääseekin maahan, kansalaisten elämä häiriintyy mahdollisesti hyvinkin merkittävästi (ks. vuoden 2020 keväällä alkanut sulkujojoilu läntisellä pallonpuoliskolla). Toisin sanoin: liikkumis- ja muut rajoitukset maan sisällä ovat seurausta rajatoimien epäonnistumisesta.

Liikkumis- ja muut rajoitukset maan sisällä ovat seurausta rajatoimien epäonnistumisesta.

Atlantinpuolisessa Kanadassa, Australiassa ja Uudessa-Seelannissa on viimeisen reilun vuoden aikana kehitetty toimintamalleja tämän toteuttamiseksi, ja aiheesta opitaan koko ajan lisää. Suomesta koronavirus on käytännössä eliminoitu useita kertoja – muualla maassa tosin HUS:ia tehokkaammin – joten tähän on meillä moniin maihin nähden hyvät edellytykset. Rajoituksia täälläkin on kuitenkin jouduttu jatkamaan, koska niiden aiheuttama vaivannäkö on ehkä arvioitu pienemmäksi, kuin rajojen terveysturvallisuuden turvaamisen aiheuttama vaivannäkö.

Kysymys: Kuulostaa kamalan hankalalta ja meillähän on jo rokote?

Vastaus: Olen huolissani neljästä asiasta, mikäli eliminaatio-/segmentaatiostrategiaa ei oteta käyttöön, tai irtikytkeytymiskyvykkyyttä aleta pikimmiten rakentamaan:

  1. Uudet variantit. Kuinka kauan haluamme tanssia uusien boosteri- ja kausirokotusten kanssa toivoen, että sellainen voittaa kilpajuoksun uutta virusvarianttia vastaan?
  2. Pitkä COVID. Mitä riskeeraamme altistamalla rokottamattomat ihmisryhmät taudille?
  3. Kansalaisvaltioiden lisääntynyt riippuvuus lääkeyhtiöjättiläisistä. Onko se toivottavaa?
  4. Seuraava pandemia. Jos emme muuta mitään, kuinka paljon haluamme lyödä vetoa sen puolesta, että saamme ensi kerralla rokotteen ennen kuin korjaamaton vahinko on tapahtunut?

Kuten THL:n seminaarissa esitin, meidän tulisi tehdä kansana päätöksiä siitä, millaisia arvoja haluamme toteuttaa pandemiauhkien kanssa toimiessa. Kun tämä on yhdessä sovittu, pienemmille yksiköille (AVIt, maakunnat, kaupungit, kylät, naapurustot, perheet, yksilöt) täytyy antaa autonomiaa toteuttaa koonsa puolesta omaan vaikutuspiirinsä kuuluvia käytännön torjuntatoimien toteutuksia, omia vahvuuksiaan hyödyntäen. Mutta parasta olisi, jos proaktiivinen ja tehokas viranomaisvaste pääosiltaan poistaisi kansalaisten tarpeen käyttää omia resurssejaan tartuntataudin selättämiseksi.

Haluan korostaa, että tämä ei ole mikään “Rajatkii!”-sotahuuto. Esimerkiksi verkostotieteen pohjalta voidaan kylmän viileästi tehdä johtopäätös, että resilienttien järjestelmien osat eivät ole kaikki yhteydessä toisiinsa kaiken aikaa (ks. esim. tämä). Mika Salmisen sanoin: Eihän korona itsestään mistään ilmesty, vaan rajojen yli se tulee.

Kiinnostuneille tutkimusviitteitä alla.

Tässä vielä 3,5 minuuttia pähkinänkuorta siitä, mitä “laipiointi” eliminaatio- / segmentaatiostrategiassa tarkoittaa. Video on pätkä Arjen Resilienssi -webinaarista; sanon siinä tartuntojen olevan menossa kohti nollaa, koska tapahtuma oli ennen kesäkuun lopun deltaorgioita.

Lukemistoa:

  • Baker, M. G., Wilson, N., & Blakely, T. (2020). Elimination could be the optimal response strategy for covid-19 and other emerging pandemic diseases. BMJ, 371, m4907. https://doi.org/10/ghqk9h
  • Balsa-Barreiro, J., Vié, A., Morales, A. J., & Cebrián, M. (2020). Deglobalization in a hyper-connected world. Nature Palgrave Communications, 6(1), 1–4. https://doi.org/10/gjfxwz
  • Flyvbjerg, B. (2020). The law of regression to the tail: How to survive Covid-19, the climate crisis, and other disasters. Environmental Science & Policy, 114, 614–618. https://doi.org/10/gjkjwz
  • Hansson, S. O. (2004). Fallacies of risk. Journal of Risk Research, 7(3), 353–360. https://doi.org/10/c7567q
  • Horton, R. (2021). Offline: The case for No-COVID. Lancet397(10272), 359. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(21)00186-0
  • Hyvönen, A.-E., Juntunen, T., Mikkola, H., Käpylä, J., Gustafsberg, H., Nyman, M., Rättilä, T., Virta, S., & Liljeroos, J. (2019). Kokonaisresilienssi ja turvallisuus: Tasot, prosessit ja arviointi [Raportti]. Valtioneuvoston kanslia. https://julkaisut.valtioneuvosto.fi/handle/10024/161358
  • Iwata, K., & Aoyagi, Y. (2021). Elimination of covid-19: A practical roadmap by segmentation. BMJ, n349. https://doi.org/10/gjqpxt
  • Käyttäytymistieteellisen neuvonantohankkeen työryhmä. (2021). Vaikuttavat valinnat päätöksenteon tukena: Käyttäytymistieteellinen neuvonanto -hankkeen loppuraportti [Sarjajulkaisu]. Valtioneuvoston kanslia. https://julkaisut.valtioneuvosto.fi/handle/10024/163138
  • Matti TJ Heino, Markus Kanerva, Maarit Lassander, & Ville Ojanen. (2021). Koronaväsymystä? Vai inhimillistä kyllästymistä, turhautumista, tottumista ja pyrkimystä normaaliin (Käyttäytymistieteellisen neuvonantoryhmän raportteja). https://vnk.fi/hanke?tunnus=VNK127:00/2020
  • Martela, F., Hankonen, N., Ryan, R. M., & Vansteenkiste, M. (2020). Motivating Voluntary Compliance to Behavioural Restrictions: Self-Determination Theory–Based Checklist of Principles for COVID-19 and Other Emergency Communications. European Review of Social Psychology. 10.1080/10463283.2020.1857082
  • Morales, A. J., Norman, J., & Bahrami, M. (Toim.). (2021). COVID-19: A Complex Systems Approach. STEM Academic Press. https://stemacademicpress.com/stem-volumes-covid-19
  • Priesemann, V., Balling, R., Brinkmann, M. M., Ciesek, S., Czypionka, T., Eckerle, I., Giordano, G., Hanson, C., Hel, Z., Hotulainen, P., Klimek, P., Nassehi, A., Peichl, A., Perc, M., Petelos, E., Prainsack, B., & Szczurek, E. (2021). An action plan for pan-European defence against new SARS-CoV-2 variants. The Lancet, S0140673621001501. https://doi.org/10/ghtzqn
  • Priesemann, V., Brinkmann, M. M., Ciesek, S., Cuschieri, S., Czypionka, T., Giordano, G., Gurdasani, D., Hanson, C., Hens, N., Iftekhar, E., Kelly-Irving, M., Klimek, P., Kretzschmar, M., Peichl, A., Perc, M., Sannino, F., Schernhammer, E., Schmidt, A., Staines, A., & Szczurek, E. (2021). Calling for pan-European commitment for rapid and sustained reduction in SARS-CoV-2 infections. The Lancet, 397(10269), 92–93. https://doi.org/10/ghp8kb
  • Rauch, E. M., & Bar-Yam, Y. (2006). Long-range interactions and evolutionary stability in a predator-prey system. Physical Review E73(2), 020903. https://doi.org/10/d9zbc4
  • Siegenfeld, A. F., & Bar-Yam, Y. (2020). The impact of travel and timing in eliminating COVID-19. Nature Communications Physics, 3(1), 1–8. https://doi.org/10/ghh8hg
  • World Health Organization Regional Office for Europe. (2020). Pandemic fatigue: Reinvigorating the public to prevent COVID-19: policy considerations for Member States in the WHO European Region (WHO/EURO:2020-1160-40906-55390). Article WHO/EURO:2020-1160-40906-55390. https://apps.who.int/iris/handle/10665/335820

Self-determined and self-organised: Fighting pandemics on the appropriate scales

The video is a Finnish talk I gave as part of a webinar series of the Institute for Health and Welfare (THL). I discuss the three scales of pandemic response: That of a) self-determined individuals, b) self-organised communities and c) governmental strategy choice in aiding these. Related, highly unpolished thoughts in English below. Slides here!

How should we think about changing people’s behaviour to mitigate pandemic threat? The starting point is to consider targets of interventions as complex systems. This means that biopsychosocial determinants such as capability, opportunity and motivation act together to create the current state of a system which is a person; aggregates of individuals define the state of a system which is a household, aggregates of which form a community, a society, and so forth. Each of these systems is of a different size, i.e. scale, and fulfills multiple roles in pandemic response – the redundancy brought about by overlap of functions performed by each element (say, individuals’ social distancing, and a community’s agreement to postpone cultural events to mitigate physical contact) is what largely ensures resilience of a system in crisis situations. In other words, information about intervention targets need to be framed as taking place within multi-level socio-ecological system, where tradeoffs between intervention nuance and scale exist. Figure below depicts this idea, and also underlines the mismatch when a large-scale unit, such as the government, attempts to dictate specifics of how e.g. schools or kindergartens should arrange their safety procedures, instead of acknowledging that “people are experts of their own environment”.

The above picture depicts a complexity profile, here a heuristic tool for considering intervention ownership. Any pandemic response must strike a balance between interventions that reach large audiences but (in spite of e.g. digital mass tailoring) are relatively homogenous, and interventions that reach small audiences but are highly tuned to their contexts. As long as the system performing the intervention remains the same, there is a fundamental tradeoff between complexity and scale, although changes in the system may allow increasing the area under the curve. Only individuals or small groups can perform ultra-local actions, and there are efforts where a larger governance structure is inevitable; those actions should be handled by agents at the appropriate scale. For example, a group of friends can come up with ideas to mingle safely, while e.g. city officials must make the decision to require quarantines and testing of incoming travellers. Horizontal axis depicts increasing audience size, from individuals to families, communities and countries. Blue line indicates the amount of nuance each entity can take into account, as depicted on the vertical axis.

Recently, we collected a sample of about 2000 people, who answered a survey on social psychological factors affecting personal protective behaviours such as mask use. As may be obvious, there are many open questions regarding implications of a cross-sectional analysis to the “real world”. Empirically evaluated social psychological phenomena are always embedded in time, making them to an extent idiographic and contextual, hence any generalisations to policy actions have to be considered in the light of nomothetic knowledge of complex systems. That is, the question of how we increase protective behaviours in the society is a multifaceted problem, requiring any actions to acknowledge the complexity of the system the behaviours take place in, and how they interact with other actions affecting community transmission. In my view, this is best done with the classical statement “First, do no harm” in mind.

A foremost condition for responsible application of science-based policy is a consideration of how the decision ought to be done, such that the costs of null effects are minimal. Finland has undertaken a suppression strategy common to European and Northern American countries, where increasingly stringent restrictions are gradually put in place while case numbers rise, and removed while cases decline. This sets different demands to individuals’ protective motivation and other personal resources (aka “pandemic fatigue”), compared to an elimination strategy, where relatively short but highly aggressive measures are taken to draw cases to zero. In the latter approach, most restrictions are lifted from case-free communities or countries, while applying border testing and quarantines to ensure the continued safety of the region’s inhabitants. In this latter case, provided that that future outbreaks are small and/or travel from regions with ongoing community transmission is low, local elimination ensues, and failures to increase protective behaviours imply – by necessity – a smaller impact than when attempted in a locale, safety of which depends mostly on personal protective behaviours.

Another consideration is that of systemic negative unintended side-effects of applying behavioural science recommendations to policy. Based on nomothetic knowledge of complex social systems and the results presented here, it is possible to give the following recommendations:

  1. Citizens’ sense of autonomy in choosing how to carry out the official pandemic mitigation recommendations should be fostered, without overlooking the necessity of feeling competence as well as camaraderie in the actions. This can be done with communication but perhaps more importantly, by facilitating people’s self-organisation tendencies and empowering them to design their own local responses, at the lowest scale (individual, family, neighbourhood, city/town, county, etc.) each of which is feasible to perform. This ensures local strengths get maximally applied, without severing functions, which are invisible to a governmental authority.
  2. Local norms (family, friends, other people in the indoor spaces one visits) ought to be stewarded to the direction which is necessary for pandemic control; this can again be done via communication, but based on literature on mitigating pandemics, it’s possible to hypothesise longer-lasting behavioural effects stemming from involving agentic individuals in the risk management of their surroundings.

Recommended reading:

  • Baker, M. G., Wilson, N., & Blakely, T. (2020). Elimination could be the optimal response strategy for covid-19 and other emerging pandemic diseases. BMJ, 371, m4907. https://doi.org/10/ghqk9h
  • Balsa-Barreiro, J., Vié, A., Morales, A. J., & Cebrián, M. (2020). Deglobalization in a hyper-connected world. Nature Palgrave Communications, 6(1), 1–4. https://doi.org/10/gjfxwz
  • Behaviour Change Science & Policy -projekti: http://linktr.ee/besp
  • Flyvbjerg, B. (2020). The law of regression to the tail: How to survive Covid-19, the climate crisis, and other disasters. Environmental Science & Policy, 114, 614–618. https://doi.org/10/gjkjwz
  • Hansson, S. O. (2004). Fallacies of risk. Journal of Risk Research, 7(3), 353–360. https://doi.org/10/c7567q
  • Horton, R. (2021). Offline: The case for No-COVID. Lancet, 397(10272), 359. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(21)00186-0
  • Hyvönen, A.-E., Juntunen, T., Mikkola, H., Käpylä, J., Gustafsberg, H., Nyman, M., Rättilä, T., Virta, S., & Liljeroos, J. (2019). Kokonaisresilienssi ja turvallisuus: Tasot, prosessit ja arviointi [Raportti]. Valtioneuvoston kanslia. https://julkaisut.valtioneuvosto.fi/handle/10024/161358
  • Iwata, K., & Aoyagi, Y. (2021). Elimination of covid-19: A practical roadmap by segmentation. BMJ, n349. https://doi.org/10/gjqpxt
  • Käyttäytymistieteellisen neuvonantohankkeen työryhmä. (2021). Vaikuttavat valinnat päätöksenteon tukena: Käyttäytymistieteellinen neuvonanto -hankkeen loppuraportti [Sarjajulkaisu]. Valtioneuvoston kanslia. https://julkaisut.valtioneuvosto.fi/handle/10024/163138
  • Matti TJ Heino, Markus Kanerva, Maarit Lassander, & Ville Ojanen. (2021). Koronaväsymystä? Vai inhimillistä kyllästymistä, turhautumista, tottumista ja pyrkimystä normaaliin (Käyttäytymistieteellisen neuvonantoryhmän raportteja). https://vnk.fi/hanke?tunnus=VNK127:00/2020
  • Martela, F., Hankonen, N., Ryan, R. M., & Vansteenkiste, M. (2020). Motivating Voluntary Compliance to Behavioural Restrictions: Self-Determination Theory–Based Checklist of Principles for COVID-19 and Other Emergency Communications. European Review of Social Psychology. 10.1080/10463283.2020.1857082
  • Morales, A. J., Norman, J., & Bahrami, M. (Toim.). (2021). COVID-19: A Complex Systems Approach. STEM Academic Press. https://stemacademicpress.com/stem-volumes-covid-19
  • Priesemann, V., Balling, R., Brinkmann, M. M., Ciesek, S., Czypionka, T., Eckerle, I., Giordano, G., Hanson, C., Hel, Z., Hotulainen, P., Klimek, P., Nassehi, A., Peichl, A., Perc, M., Petelos, E., Prainsack, B., & Szczurek, E. (2021). An action plan for pan-European defence against new SARS-CoV-2 variants. The Lancet, S0140673621001501. https://doi.org/10/ghtzqn
  • Priesemann, V., Brinkmann, M. M., Ciesek, S., Cuschieri, S., Czypionka, T., Giordano, G., Gurdasani, D., Hanson, C., Hens, N., Iftekhar, E., Kelly-Irving, M., Klimek, P., Kretzschmar, M., Peichl, A., Perc, M., Sannino, F., Schernhammer, E., Schmidt, A., Staines, A., & Szczurek, E. (2021). Calling for pan-European commitment for rapid and sustained reduction in SARS-CoV-2 infections. The Lancet, 397(10269), 92–93. https://doi.org/10/ghp8kb
  • Rauch, E. M., & Bar-Yam, Y. (2006). Long-range interactions and evolutionary stability in a predator-prey system. Physical Review E, 73(2), 020903. https://doi.org/10/d9zbc4
  • Siegenfeld, A. F., & Bar-Yam, Y. (2020). The impact of travel and timing in eliminating COVID-19. Communications Physics, 3(1), 1–8. https://doi.org/10/ghh8hg
  • World Health Organization Regional Office for Europe. (2020). Pandemic fatigue: Reinvigorating the public to prevent COVID-19: policy considerations for Member States in the WHO European Region (WHO/EURO:2020-1160-40906-55390). Article WHO/EURO:2020-1160-40906-55390. https://apps.who.int/iris/handle/10665/335820

Pandemia haastaa ajattelumme: Neljä kompastuskiveä torjuntapolulla

This is a series of five videos (in Finnish), outlining what I currently consider the most important facets of Finnish pandemic preparedness. Also published at motivationselfmanagement.com

PÄIVITYS 27.03.2021: Ennustan, että tulemme poistamaan rajoitukset liian aikaisin, mikä johtaa alla esitetyn mukaisesti uusiin ongelmiin, yllätyksiin ja viivästyksiin epidemian poistamisessa Suomesta. Mikäli tälle ennustukselle haluaa laittaa kapuloita rattaisiin, voi käydä allekirjoittamassa uuden kansalaisaloitteen (en ole itse ollut mukana sen laatimisessa).


Videoissa alla selitän asiat, jotka näen tärkeimpinä ja tieteellistä tarkastelua parhaiten kestävinä näkökulmina suomalaiseen pandemiavasteeseen. Näkemykset eivät ole Behaviour Change & Well-being -tutkimusryhmän, Valtioneuvoston kanslian käyttäytymistieteellisen neuvonantoryhmän, tai Citizen Shield -pandemiavalmiushankkeen virallisia kantoja.

Osa 0: Johdatus käyttäytymiseen, järjestelmiin ja keskinäisriippuvaisuuteen.

Osa 1: Leveysrajoitteisista hännistä.

Osa 2: Noususta, tuhosta ja oikea-aikaisuudesta. [Erratum: Eksponentiaalisen kasvun/laskun selityksessä pitäisi tarkalleen ottaen olla ison R:n sijaan pieni r – kyseessä siis eksponentiaalisen yhtälön r-kasvuparametri, ei tartuttavuusluku R0]

Tässä vielä yksi pointti siitä, miten kasvu hahmotetaan (lähde):

Osa 3: Ikävien yllätysten minimoinnista.

Osa 4: Resilienssistä ja yhteenveto.

Videoissa mainittu tilannekuvaa ylläpitävä verkkosivu:

epidemia.fi

Relevantteja blogipostauksia:

Kanadan tilanteesta:

https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/diseases/2019-novel-coronavirus-infection/latest-travel-health-advice.html

https://travel.gc.ca/travel-covid

Mainittuja/relevantteja julkaisuja:

0. Cirillo, P. & Taleb, N. N. Tail risk of contagious diseases. Nature Physics 16, 606–613 (2020).

1.Rauch, E. M. & Bar-Yam, Y. Long-range interactions and evolutionary stability in a predator-prey system. Phys. Rev. E 73, 020903 (2006).

2.Kollepara, P. K., Siegenfeld, A. F., Taleb, N. N. & Bar-Yam, Y. Unmasking the mask studies: why the effectiveness of surgical masks in preventing respiratory infections has been underestimated. arXiv:2102.04882 [q-bio] (2021).

3.Siegenfeld, A. F. & Bar-Yam, Y. The impact of travel and timing in eliminating COVID-19. Communications Physics 3, 1–8 (2020).

4.Taleb, N. N., Bar-Yam, Y. & Cirillo, P. On single point forecasts for fat-tailed variables. International Journal of Forecasting (2020) doi:10/ghgvdx.

5.Siegenfeld, A. F., Taleb, N. N. & Bar-Yam, Y. Opinion: What models can and cannot tell us about COVID-19. PNAS (2020) doi:10.1073/pnas.2011542117.

6.Wong, V., Cooney, D. & Bar-Yam, Y. Beyond Contact Tracing: Community-Based Early Detection for Ebola Response. PLoS Currents (2016) doi:10.1371/currents.outbreaks.322427f4c3cc2b9c1a5b3395e7d20894.

7.Shen, C., Taleb, N. N. & Bar-Yam, Y. Review of Ferguson et al ‘Impact of non-pharmaceutical interventions…’ (2020).

Kirjallisuutta eliminaatio-/segmentaatiostrategiasta:

1.Geoghegan, J. L., Moreland, N. J., Le Gros, G. & Ussher, J. E. New Zealand’s science-led response to the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. Nat Immunol 22, 262–263 (2021).

2.The Lancet Infectious Diseases. The COVID-19 exit strategy—why we need to aim low. The Lancet Infectious Diseases S1473309921000803 (2021) doi:10/gh4kvk.

3.Morell, M., Estrada, K., Dominguez, E., Perez, A. & Montesino, D. The Efficacy of Long-Term Elimination Efforts: A Case Study on New Zealand’s SARS. 20.

4.Baker, M. G., Kvalsvig, A. & Verrall, A. J. New Zealand’s COVID‐19 elimination strategy. Medical Journal of Australia 213, 198 (2020).

5.Summers, D. J. et al. Potential lessons from the Taiwan and New Zealand health responses to the COVID-19 pandemic. The Lancet Regional Health – Western Pacific 4, 100044 (2020).

6.Heywood, A. E. & Macintyre, C. R. Elimination of COVID-19: what would it look like and is it possible? The Lancet Infectious Diseases 20, 1005–1007 (2020).

7.Wilson, N., Boyd, M., Kvalsvig, A., Chambers, T. & Baker, M. Public Health Aspects of the Covid-19 Response and Opportunities for the Post-Pandemic Era. pq 16, (2020).

8.Elimination of covid-19. A practical roadmap by segmentation. m4907 (2021).

9.Priesemann, V. et al. An action plan for pan-European defence against new SARS-CoV-2 variants. The Lancet S0140673621001501 (2021) doi:10/ghtzqn.

10.Sachs, J. D. et al. Lancet COVID-19 Commission Statement on the occasion of the 75th session of the UN General Assembly. The Lancet 396, 1102–1124 (2020).

11.Lee, A., Thornley, S., Morris, A. J. & Sundborn, G. Should countries aim for elimination in the covid-19 pandemic? BMJ 370, m3410 (2020).

12.Blakely, T. et al. The probability of the 6‐week lockdown in Victoria (commencing 9 July 2020) achieving elimination of community transmission of SARS‐CoV‐2. Medical Journal of Australia 213, 349 (2020).

13.Priesemann, V. et al. Calling for pan-European commitment for rapid and sustained reduction in SARS-CoV-2 infections. The Lancet 397, 92–93 (2021).

14.Baker, M. G., Wilson, N. & Blakely, T. Elimination could be the optimal response strategy for covid-19 and other emerging pandemic diseases. BMJ 371, m4907 (2020).

15.Blakely, T., Thompson, J., Bablani, L., Andersen, P., Ouakrim, D. A., Carvalho, N., Abraham, P., Boujaoude, M.-A., Katar, A., Akpan, E., Wilson, N., & Stevenson, M. (2021). Determining the optimal COVID-19 policy response using agent-based modelling linked to health and cost modelling: Case study for Victoria, Australia. MedRxiv, 2021.01.11.21249630. https://doi.org/10/gjh8x5

The Complexity Matters Vodcast

On Fred Hasselman‘s initiative, we started a new show where we host a live-streamed discussion on complexity topics. I will gather a list of episodes with synopses in this post.

Note: The next episode is scheduled to take place on 12 January at 12:30 CET, when we interrogate Travis Wiltshire on issues regarding team dynamics!

S01E01: Complexity in psychological self-ratings.

We discussed Merlijn Olthof’s new paper Complexity in psychological self-ratings: implications for research and practice. Links are found in video comments on the YouTube page, but here are some extras:

Additional resources:

Interaction is not interaction: An interview with Fred Hasselman

I had the opportunity to interview Fred Hasselman, the main architect of casnet: An R toolbox for studying Complex Adaptive Systems and NETworks. We spoke of how compatible the complex systems perspective is with some methods widely used in social sciences.

A few notes:

  • Multilevel models (and what you put in those) come in many varietiesand some are useful
  • Interaction is not interaction
    • Interaction (1): Two variables are intertwined – or “coupled” – in such a way, that they cannot be separated without severing the phenomena arising from their interplay.
    • Interaction (2): A multiplicative, instead of additive, relationship in a linear regression model, where you can partial out variance and get nice beta weights for each variable to determine their individual impacts.
    • The two meanings presented above are logically inconsistent: See #36 in Scott Lilienfield’s “Fifty psychological and psychiatric terms to avoid
  • Interdependence means you can’t use the regular statistics which social scientists know and love.
    • … because you lose additivity.
  • “Don’t infer causality, observe it.”
    • When the system you’re looking at is an individual instead of e.g. the society, you’re in the quite happy position, that lab studies are possible (if you’re smart about them).
  • An excellent paper from Merljin Olthof: Complexity in psychological self-ratings: implications for research and practice
  • Additional resources:
    • A symposium we held on complexity in behavioural science, evidence and policy.
    • A workshop by Fred Hasselman (scroll to the end for an extensive reading list).
    • University of Helsinki course by Matti: CARMA – Critical Appraisal of Research Methods and Analysis.

Because every post needs an image, here’s Julia Rohrer‘s (2017) Theory of Regulation of Empty Theories (TROETE)

Complexity perspectives on behaviour change interventions

I had the great pleasure to be involved in organising a symposium on the topic of my dissertation. Many if not most societal problems are both behavioural and complex; hence the speakers’ backgrounds varied from systems science, and psychology to social work and physics. Below is a list of video links along with a short synopsis of the talks. See here for other symposia in the Behaviour Change Science and Policy series.

A live-tweeting thread on 1st day here, 2nd day (not including presentations by me, Nanne Isokuortti or Ira Alanko) here. See here for the official web page, and here for the YouTube playlist!

Nelli Hankonen: Opening words & introduction to the Behaviour Change Science & Policy (BeSP) project

  • See here for videos of previous symposia (I: Intervention evaluation & field experiments; II: Behavioural insights in developing public policy and interventions; III: Reverse translation: Practice-based evidence; IV: Creating real-world impact: Implementation and dissemination of behaviour change interventions)

Marijn de Bruijn: Integrating Behavioural Science in COVID-19 Prevention Efforts – The Dutch Case

  • Behaviour change efforts for COVID-19 protective behaviours are operations on a complex system’s user experience: A virus is the problem, but behaviour is the solution.
  • Knee-jerk communication responses of health officials can be improved upon by using methods derived from what works in real-world behavioural science interventions.
  • Protective behaviours entail feedback dynamics: for example, crowding leads to difficulty maintaining distance, which leads to perceiving that others don’t consider it important, which leads to more crowding, etc.

Nelli Hankonen: Why is it Useful to Consider Complexity Insights in Behaviour Change Research?

  • Complexity-informed approaches to intervention have been around for a long time, but only recently analytical methodology has become widely available.
  • There are important differences between “complicated” and “complex” behavioural interventions.
  • By not taking the complexity perspective into account, we may be missing opportunities to properly design interventions.

Olli-Pekka Heinonen: Complexity-Informed Policymaking

  • If a civil servant wants to be effective, maximum control doesn’t work – even what constitutes “progress” can be difficult to ascertain.
  • Systems, such as the society, move: what worked yesterday, might not work today.
  • Hence continuous learning, adaptation and experimenting are not optional for societal decision-making.

Gwen Marchand: Complexity Science in the Design and Evaluation of Behaviour Interventions

  • What does it mean to define behavior and behavior change from a complex systems perspective?
  • Focal units and well-defined timescales are key considerations for design and research of intervention 
  • Context acts to constrain and afford possible states for behavior change related to intervention

Jari Saramäki: How do Behaviours, Ideas, and Contagious Diseases Spread Through Networks?

  • People are embedded in networks that influence their behaviour and health
  • Network structure – how the networks’ links are organized – strongly affects this influence
  • Interventions that modify network structure can be used to promote or hinder the spread of influence or contagion.

Matti Heino: Studying Complex Motivation Systems – Capturing Dynamical Patterns of Change in Data from Self-assessments and Wearable Technology

  • Analysis of living beings involves addressing interconnected, turbulent processes that vary across time.
  • Recruiting less individuals and collecting more data on fewer variables, may be a considerably beneficial tradeoff to better understand dynamics of a psychological phenomenon.
  • Methods to deal with such data include building networks of networks (multiplex recurrence networks) and assessing early warning signals of sudden gains or losses.

If you’re interested in the links, download my slides here. I actually forgot to show what a multiplex network of variables combined from several theories looks like (you don’t condition on all other variables, so you can combine stuff from different frameworks without the meaning of the variables changing, as in a regression-based analysis). Anyway, it looks like this:

A single person’s multiplex recurrence network, i.e. a network of recurrence networks of work motivation variables queried daily for 30+ days. Colored connectors are relationships which can’t be attributed to randomness.

Nanne Isokuortti: From Exploration to Sustainment – Understanding Complex Implementation in Public Social Services

  • Illustrate the complexity in an implementation process with a real-world case example
  • Introduce Exploration, Preparation, Implementation, and Sustainment (EPIS) Framework
  • Provide suggestions how to aid implementation in complex settings

Ira Alanko: The AuroraAI Programme

  • The Finnish public sector is taking active steps to utilise AI to make using of  services easier
  • AI has opened a window for a systemic shift towards human-centricity in Finland
  • The AuroraAI-network is a collection of different components, not a platform or collection of chatbots

Daniele Proverbio: Smooth or Abrupt? How Dynamical Systems Change Their State

  • Natural phenomena don’t necessarily follow smooth and linear patterns while evolving.
  • Abrupt changes are common in complex, non-linear systems. These are arguably the future of scientific research.
  • There exist a limited number of transition classes. Understanding their main drivers could lead to useful insights and applications.

Ken Resnicow:  Behavior Change is a Complex Process. How does that impact theory, research and practice?

  • Behavior change is a complex, non linear process.
  • Sudden change is more enduring than gradual change.
  • Failure to replicate prior interventions can be understood from a complexity lens.

(nb. on the last talk: personally, I’m not a huge fan of mediation analysis, moderated or otherwise. Stay tuned for an interview where I discuss the topic at some length with Fred Hasselman)

Notes from the symposium by Grace Lau

Ease of motivating citizens to act on different phases of the epidemic / rajoitusmotivaatio epidemian eri vaiheissa

Itseohjautuvat kansalaiset, kriisinkestävä yhteiskunta

This post outlines some musings from the trenches of the Finnish Coronavirus battle, based on thoughts I laid out in two recent newspaper interviews (1, 2).  It’s in Finnish, but please contact me for any questions. Also appeared on my other blog, motivationselfmanagement.com.

Olen ollut tänä vuonna paljon tekemisissä suomalaisten terveysviranomaisten ja kansainvälisen tiedeyhteisön välisten näkemyserojen kanssa. Yksi huolestuttavimmista piirteistä, joita olen havainnut, on koulutettujen ihmisten (mukaanluettuna lääkärit) piireissä toistellut varoitukset ”veneen keikuttamisesta”. Ajatuskulku menee jotenkin niin, että luottamus viranomaisiin aiheuttaa hyvin toimivan viranomaiskoneiston, jolloin ”luottamuksen nakertaminen” nähdään hyökkäyksenä parhaansa tekeviä yhteiskunnallisia instituutioita vastaan. Syy ja seuraus menevät tietenkin päinvastaiseen suuntaan, eli hyvin ja läpinäkyvästi toimiva viranomaiskoneisto aiheuttaa luottamusta, ja esimerkiksi kevään aikana nähdyt tärkeiden asiakirjojen salailutapaukset ruokkivat epäluottamusta.

Luottamuksen ansaitseminen ei ole ihan turha asia ja suljettujen ovien takana toimiminen saattaa johtaa ikäviin seurauksiin. Maailmallahan on käyty paljon keskustelua siitä, riistääkö valtio kansalaistensa vapautta pakottamalla heidät käyttämään kasvomaskeja vai onko kyseessä tupakoinnin rajoittamisen kaltainen tapa pyrkiä takaamaan kaikille oikeus terveeseen elämään. Suomalaisesta näkökulmasta tämä on tietenkin järjetön keskustelu; pääosin ymmärrämme esim. selvinpäin ajamisen ja vilkun käytön – maskien tavoin – suojelevan muita kuin itseämme, ja olemme muutenkin tottuneet siihen, että meille kerrotaan kuinka terveydestä tulee pitää huolta.

Toki ehkä vähän liikaakin.

Johtavat terveysviranomaiset kevään ja kesän mittaan panostivat erittäin paljon sen viestimiseen, että nyt ei ole kenelläkään täällä mitään hätää (ks. esim. “Virus jyllää kolmesta kuuteen kuukautta ja sitten se katoaa“). Ehkä taustalla oli ajattelu, että huoli kiihdyttää ihmiset paniikinomaiseen berserkkitilaan, eikä ihmisille voi siksi antaa vastuuta riskiarvioistaan. (Sivuhuomiona, tutkimusnäyttö viittaa siihen, että Hollywoodin luomasta kuvasta poiketen, kriiseissä toimitaan pääosin altruistisesti ja rationaalisesti.) Mutta on sekä yhteiskunnallisen riskinhallinnan, että yksilön henkisen kriisinkestävyyden kannalta viisaampaa huolestua tietynlaisista uhista ensin paljon ja sitten tiedon karttuessa vähentää huolestuneisuutta1.

paniikki
Lääkärin realiteetteja kuvastava vastaus kysymykseen “Miten ihmiset voi[si]vat alkaa hahmottamaan tartuttamisen ja sairastumisen riskejä laajasti mutta tasapainoisesti?”

Jos alkujaan suhtautuu potentiaalisesti hyvinkin viheliäiseen patogeeniin positiivisella ajattelulla (kuten esim. silloin, kun vielä viestittiin ilmateitse tarttumisesta turhana pelotteluna), jatkuva huonojen uutisten virta (ilmateitse tarttuminen, pitkäaikaissairauden vakavuus, jne.) voi alkaa jossain vaiheessa kuormittamaan niin, että ihminen lakkaa kiinnittämästä huomiota virusviestintään, jolloin rajoitustoimien jatkamisesta tulee yhä hankalampaa. Tämä ei kuitenkaan ole uutisten, vaan huolettoman lähtökohdan syytä. Vaikka harva silloin ymmärsi viestin, jo tammikuussa oli selvää, miten tulisi kohdella räjähdysaltista uhkaa. Sittemmin tieteellisissä julkaisuissa on osoitettu, että pandemiat ovat itse asiassa vakavimpia globaalia hyvinvointia uhkaava tekijöitä (ks. 1 ja 2).

On sekä yhteiskunnallisen riskinhallinnan, että yksilön henkisen kriisinkestävyyden kannalta viisaampaa huolestua tietynlaisista uhista ensin paljon ja sitten tiedon karttuessa vähentää huolestuneisuutta.

Järjestelmät, joissa valta on keskitetty harvoille kokonaiskuvaa hallitseville tahoille, ovat hauraita. Tämä on opittu yhtä lailla terroristiverkostoissa kuin liike-elämässäkin, jossa on viime aikoina alleviivattu entistä enemmän itsensä johtamisen tärkeyttä. Aikamme suurin itseorganisoitumishaaste tuleekin tässä: kun rajoitukset alkavat taas purra ja virusta näkyy yhä vähemmän, riskin näkyvyys vähenee ja ihmiset hölläävät käyttäytymistään, vaikkei tulipaloa ole vielä kokonaan sammutettu. Koronavirus ”kytee” vähäoireisilla ja testeihin hakeudutaan vähemmän, kunnes tapaukset taas räjähtävät käsiin.

Ease of motivating citizens to act on different phases of the epidemic / rajoitusmotivaatio epidemian eri vaiheissa

Toinen aalto on jo täällä. Miten vältämme kolmannen?

Maskit muistuttajana katukuvassa

Näytti siltä, että maskeista luotiin kevään ja kesän aikana kovalla työllä suurta mörköä. Sen aikana esim. maskit päällä kaupassa Tampereella käyneitä kavereitani yritettiin tulla sylkemään päin – vaimollekin huudeltiin kadulla oluttölkin takaa ”Ei tost oo apua!”. Ja sanon näytti siltä, koska Hanlonin partaveitsi velvoittaa pitämään sen mahdollisuuden auki, että kyse oli vain epäpätevyydestä. Mielestäni on kuitenkin päivänselvää, ettei ihmismieli lue suosituksia kirjaimellisesti, jolloin “Emme anna suositusta kasvomaskien käyttöön” tulkitaan helposti “Emme suosittele kasvomaskien käyttöä” tai “Suosittelemme olemaan käyttämättä kasvomaskeja”. Viranomaisten maskidenialismi on ollut tähän asti sanalla sanoen vastuutonta. Toivon, että maskisuosituksen puolivillaisuudesta huolimatta alamme syksyn edetessä nähdä maskeja paljon enemmän katukuvassa, aina siihen saakka kunnes virus on nitistetty.

Testaamisen uusia tuulia

Toivon, että näemme pian uusia testiratkaisuja. Mahdollisuuksien piiriin ovat esimerkiksi tulossa syljestä virusta seulovat pikatestit, jotka ovat nykyistä nenään työnnettävää puikkoa huomattavasti helppokäyttöisemmät ja miellyttävämmät, vaikkakin vähemmän herkät. Lisäksi oireettomia tartuttajia voidaan seuloa esim. kouluista niin, että kaikki luokan oppilaat sylkevät pussiin, pussin sisältö analysoidaan, ja jos sieltä löytyy virusta, kaikki luokkalaiset eristetään tai laitetaan karanteeniin automaattisesti. Maailmalla erinomaisia tuloksia tuoneesta tietokonetomografiasta ei ole Suomessa toistaiseksi edes voinut keskustella.

Yhteishenkeä painottava viestintä

Voisimmeko myös viestiä paremmin? Rajoitustoimia motivoivassa viestinnässä toisten auttamisen tulisi olla asian ytimessä, esim. kansainvälistä Masks4All-liikettä mukaileva ”Suojaa minua, suojaan sinua” (tai Suojaa selustaani, minä suojaan sinun!). Tässä lisäksi kuusi vinkkiä, erästä tieteellistä julkaisua Suomen kontekstiin mukaellen:

  1. Selkeät ja tarkat ohjeet: Viestiminen riittävän yksinkertaisesti ja ja konkreettisia esimerkkejä antaen – kuitenkin ymmärtäen, että tiedon tarjoaminen on tarpeellista, muttei itsessään riittävää käyttäytymiseen vaikuttamiseksi. Erinomaisen tärkeää on olla selkeä siinä, että A) tauti on äärimmäisen vaarallinen, B) se leviää hengitysilmassa, hämmästyttävän nopeasti ja oireettakin, C) voimme päästä siitä eroon käyttäytymistämme muuttamalla.
  2. Suojellaan toisiamme -viestit: Sen painottaminen, että estämällä koronaviruksen leviämistä, suojellaan muita. Viestit, jotka kohdistuvat vain omiin riskeihin, eivät ole tehokkaita mikäli vastaanottaja ei koe itse olevansa altis riskille.
  3. Yhtenäisen rintaman viestit: Ryhmäjäsenyyden (esim. omaan perheeseen, kuntaan, kaupunkiin tai suomalaisuuteen kuulumisen) korostaminen, kuitenkin välttäen “me-vastaan-muut”-henkeä.
  4. Meikäläiset toimivat näin -viestit: Viruksen leviämistä rajoittavan käyttäytymisen esittäminen sellaisena, joka on osa ryhmään kuulumista, ja johon oman ryhmän jäsenet kannustavat.
  5. Suunnittelun ja suunnitelmien säännöllistä arviointia tukevat viestit: Tukimateriaali, joka antaa konkreettisia ohjeita sen suunnitteluun, kuinka esim. perhepiirin kesken voidaan toimia suositusten mukaan hankaloittaen kuitenkin omaa elämää mahdollisimman vähän.
  6. Mahdollistamista tukevat viestit: Kerrotaan konkreettisesta tarjolla olevasta avusta, esim. liittyen sosiaalitoimen palveluihin.

Itseohjautuvuus ja väärät kartat

Väärän kartan päättelyvirheellä (best map fallacy) tarkoitetaan sitä, että ajatellaan minkä tahansa mallin olevan parempi, kuin ei mallia ollenkaan. Mutta jos olet seikkailemassa Belgradissa, Tukholman kartasta on vain haittaa ja tarvitset ennemminkin havaintokykysi ja avoimen mielen. Monet kevään virustorjunnan ongelmista johtivat siitä, että koronavirusta yritettiin pakottaa influenssamalliin, vaikka parempaa tietoa oli saatavilla.

Kun ainoa työkalusi on influenssamalli, kaikki ongelmat alkavat näyttämään influenssalta.

– Henri Lampikoski, lääkäri ja Eroon koronasta -verkoston perustajajäsen

Kuten maailmallakin, kansalaiskeskustelu oli merkittävä tekijä, joka Suomessa sai epäröivän hallituksen muuttamaan politiikkansa laumasuojan tavoittelusta tolkullisiin toimiin. Esimerkiksi Eroon koronasta -verkostossa olemme työskennelleet palkatta päivittäin oman toimemme ohella paremman tiedonkäytön puolesta, mitä ei ole helpottanut se, että tilannekuvatietoa on herunut viranomaisilta varsin vähän. Ehkä tulevaisuudessa käytämmekin suomalaisten kouluttautuneisuuden paremmin hyödyksi päätöksenteossa, emmekä yritä päättää uhkien huolestuttavuudesta keskitetysti kaikkien kansalaisten puolesta. Toivottavasti siis opimme tästä ja alamme johtamaan yhteiskuntaamme yhdessä, varovaisuusperiaate mielessä pitäen.

Yksilöiden ja heidän lähipiirinsä pienet päivittäiset valinnat ovat koronasta eroon pääsemisen avain

Tästä pääsemme myös takaisin itsensä johtamiseen: Yksilöiden ja heidän lähipiirinsä pienet päivittäiset valinnat ovat koronasta eroon pääsemisen avain, byrokratian hitaasti pyörivät rattaat auttavat jos auttavat. Virus voidaan tukahduttaa yhtä eksponentiaalisella nopeudella, kuin millä se on levinnytkin.

ps. Onko sinustakin tuntunut, että ”Korona yllätti viranomaiset” on uudenlainen vakiouutistyyppi? Erinomainen yhteenveto aiheesta löytyy täältä.

pps. Löydät kuvitetun oppaan suomalaiselle koronarintamalle täältä; tärkeimpiä suomennettuja artikkeleita täältä, ja omat suosikkini täältä.

ppps. Olen tässä postauksessa käsitellyt pääosin kevään sekoiluja, mutta kesän ja syyskuun välille mahtuu hämmästyttävä määrä samaa sarjaa.